The Beginning of the End of an Abomination

U.N is set to ban horrific practice

On Monday, [Khady] Koita, a leading figure in the campaign against female genital mutilation (FGM), will join other high-profile activists at the United Nations to drum up support for a global ban on a practice forced on millions of children every year.

"FGM is horrific, brutal, degrading and indefensible," said Koita, who was born in Senegal and now lives in Brussels. "My big hope is that one day no girl will have to go through what I have been through."

Presidential Elections Are Just One Way to Change the World

Howard Zinn: The Optimism of Uncertainty

We don’t have to engage in grand, heroic actions to participate in the process of change. Small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, can transform the world. Even when we don’t “win,” there is fun and fulfillment in the fact that we have been involved, with other good people, in something worthwhile. We need hope. An optimist isn’t necessarily a blithe, slightly sappy whistler in the dark of our time. To be hopeful in bad times is not just foolishly romantic. It is based on the fact that human history is a history not only of cruelty, but also of compassion, sacrifice, courage, kindness. What we choose to emphasize in this complex history will determine our lives. If we see only the worst, it destroys our capacity to do something. If we remember those times and places — and there are so many — where people have behaved magnificently, this gives us the energy to act, and at least the possibility of sending this spinning top of a world in a different direction. And if we do act, in however small a way, we don’t have to wait for some grand utopian future. The future is an infinite succession of presents, and to live now as we think human beings should live, in defiance of all that is bad around us, is itself a marvelous victory.

Commit Some Pronoia on Yourself

Telling Fewer Lies Linked to Better Health

Telling the truth when tempted to lie can significantly improve a person’s mental and physical health, according to a “Science of Honesty” study presented at the American Psychological Association’s 120th Annual Convention.

“Recent evidence indicates that Americans average about 11 lies per week. We wanted to find out if living more honestly can actually cause better health,” said lead author Anita E. Kelly, PhD, professor of psychology at the University of Notre Dame. “We found that the participants could purposefully and dramatically reduce their everyday lies, and that in turn was associated with significantly improved health.”

Conspiracy to Protect the Environment and Focus on Well-Being

Bhutan aims to be first 100% organic nation

The Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan, famed for seeking “happiness” for its citizens, is aiming to become the first nation in the world to turn its home-grown food and farmers 100 percent organic.

The tiny Buddhist-majority nation wedged between China and India has an unusual and some say enviable approach to economic development, centred on protecting the environment and focusing on mental well-being.

Healers Conspiring to Find New Healing Agents

New antibiotic cures disease by disarming pathogens, not killing them

A new type of antibiotic can effectively treat an antibiotic-resistant infection by disarming instead of killing the bacteria that cause it. Researchers report their findings in the October 2 issue of mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

“Traditionally, people have tried to find antibiotics that rapidly kill bacteria. But we found a new class of antibiotics which has no ability to kill Acinetobacter that can still protect, not by killing the bug, but by completely preventing it from turning on host inflammation,” says Brad Spellberg of the UCLA Medical Center and David Geffen School of Medicine, a researcher on the study.

Pronoia Goes Mainstream

Arianna Huffington of Huffingtonpost.com said that the media has a responsibility to “cover what is working, to put the spotlight on the good things happening.” She described dedicated sections at The Huffington Post meant to do just that. “We need to celebrate the good obsessively,” she said.

Arianna went on to say, “We need to change the narrative away from this fatalistic hopelessness that is permeating this country at the moment, and towards the belief once again, that as John Gardner said, ‘What we have before us are some breathtaking opportunities disguised as insoluble problems.'”

Are You Aware of the Conspiracy to Improve Life on This Planet?

There’s a tuition-free online university aimed at poor students around the globe who would otherwise not have access to higher education.

[Shai] Reshef founded the school in 2009. After making millions from several for-profit, online education ventures in the U.S., Europe and the Middle East, he says he realized just how inaccessible higher education is for most people around the world.

“Listen, everyone should be educated,” Reshef says. “I care about the people who don’t have the right to an education right now, and they should have the right.”

Strangers Helping Strangers With No Ulterior Motive

Winnipeg Bus Driver Gives Homeless Man The Shoes Off His Feet

Commuters on a Winnipeg bus Tuesday morning became unexpected witnesses to an incredible act of kindness.

According to CBC News, the bus driver pulled over on a corner and began chatting with a homeless man on the street. After a couple of minutes, he removed his shoes and gave them to the barefoot young man. The driver then got back on the bus in his socks and carried on with his route.

Creative People You Don’t Know Are Hard at Work Trying to Solve Big Problems

New Wind Turbine Makes Drinking Water

A French inventor may have an answer for the millions of people who scramble to find fresh drinking water each day: a wind turbine that literally pulls H2O from the air. Marc Parent, head of Eoie Water, designed the turbine while living in the Caribbean and enduring water shortages. His solution is called the WMS1000, which gathers moisture from the air and turns it into drinking water, ABC News reports.