Pronoia Goes Mainstream

Arianna Huffington of Huffingtonpost.com said that the media has a responsibility to “cover what is working, to put the spotlight on the good things happening.” She described dedicated sections at The Huffington Post meant to do just that. “We need to celebrate the good obsessively,” she said.

Arianna went on to say, “We need to change the narrative away from this fatalistic hopelessness that is permeating this country at the moment, and towards the belief once again, that as John Gardner said, ‘What we have before us are some breathtaking opportunities disguised as insoluble problems.'”

Maybe the Good News Is As Worthy of Reporting As the Other Kind

A follow-up on some of 2011’s good news stories

Call it the feel-good flavor of the day. One story of bravery, kindness or generosity can take the world by storm, but in this 24/7 news cycle, most heroes only get five minutes of fame.

What happens when the cameras stop rolling? What does a brush with fame do to a good person? Is it possible that it makes their lives, dare we say, better? We decided to find out.

Just Another Person Working Very Hard to Do Good Deeds

Greatest person of the Day

The Paradigm Project co-founder wants to bring fuel-efficient stoves to poor, rural communities around the world. The stoves can save time and money, while also reducing toxic emissions from wood fires by 40 to 60 percent. That results in 7.5 metric tons of carbon offsets, which can then be sold in European and American-based carbon markets