Towards a New Spirituality in Art

“The Remodernist Manifesto” by Billy Childish and Charles Thomson

We don’t need more dull, boring, brainless destruction of convention . . . We need an art that integrates body and soul and recognizes enduring and underlying principles which have sustained wisdom and insight  throughout humanity’s history.

Towards a New Spirituality in Poetry

“The Kosmic Karma of an Integral Poet” by Paul Lonely

Dear postmodern and contemporary artists of the world: You’re trying too hard. Most of you seem to be dead set on becoming the next ‘mad genius.’ And, quite frankly, it’s cliché . . . It’s high time for a group of integral artists to transcend the trendiness of self-deconstruction and call for a global transformation. May I be so bold as to offer a couple new mantras for the 21st century? Here’s the first: Art for Spirit’s Sake. Do you like it? If so, I offer the second: Sanity is the new Crazy. Shadow work, meditation, yoga, contemplation, prayer, authentic self inquiry. SANITY is the new Crazy.

Never Say Never

Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel by Michio Kaku

IMPOSSIBLE! Preposterous! These words are often thrown about when people declare certain things to be scientifically ridiculous. Aliens cannot reach the Earth in spaceships, they proclaim, because the distance between stars is too great. Telepathy is impossible since the brain does not emit or receive messages. And it’s impossible to instantaneously transport an object from A to B because you cannot know the location and momentum of all its atoms — teleportation would violate the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

Yet if you carefully analyze these examples, you realize that they are merely impossible today or in the near future. The real question is, are they impossible with technologies that lie decades, centuries or even millennia beyond ours? Perhaps these ‘impossibilities’ are merely very difficult engineering problems. The late Arthur C. Clarke once said, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”